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Clinical Trials Webinar: Capecitabine, Gemcitabine, & Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Cholangiocarcinoma

March 21, 2010 2 comments

 Cholangiocarcinoma Foundation Badge

The Cholangiocarcinoma Foundation is generously sponsoring a free Webinar this Tuesday, March 23, 2010 at 11:30am – 12:30 pm EDT.

As part of our ongoing Spotlight on Clinical Trials series, The Cholangiocarcinoma Foundation invites you to join them for the upcoming web-based seminar featuring the active cholangiocarcinoma clinical trial entitled, “Capecitabine, Gemcitabine, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder or Bile Duct.” Principal Investigator Dr. Edgar Ben-Josef of the University of Michigan will lead the discussion of this clinical trial. A question and answer session will follow Dr. Ben-Josef’s remarks.

Click here to register.

This clinical trial was developed by the Southwest Oncology Group, and is a multi-center phase II clinical trial studying how well giving capecitabine together with gemcitabine followed by capecitabine and radiation therapy works in treating patients with cancer of the gallbladder or bile duct. In this trial, participants receive oral capecitabine every 12 hours on days 1-14, and gemcitabine hydrochloride IV over 30 minutes on days 1 and 8. Treatment repeats every 21 days for 4 courses in the absence of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. After the 12 week cycle concludes, participants begin receiving oral capecitabine every 12 hours on days 1-7, and undergo concurrent three-dimensional or intensity-modulated radiotherapy on days 1-5. Treatment repeats weekly for 5-6 weeks in the absence of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity.

All you need is an internet connection to join this Web-based seminar.  Once registered, you will receive an email with a link specific to you and instructions on how to join the Webinar on Tuesday.

PICC or PORT Line for Chemo?

March 10, 2010 10 comments

To PICC or PORT, that is the question:” With apologies to the Bard of Avon, my topic today is to discuss some of the differences between a PICC line and a PORT for chemotherapy. 

A PICC is a Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter.  It is essentially an intravenous (IV) line that is inserted into a peripheral vein, typically in the upper arm, and advanced until the catheter tip terminates in a large vein in the chest near the heart to obtain intravenous access. It is similar to other central lines such as Central Lines or Ports as it terminates into a large vessel near the heart (the superior vena cava). However, unlike other central lines, its point of insertion is from the periphery of the body and usually a vein in the upper arm is the most common insertion point.

Unlike a standard IV line which is inserted in an arm or hand vein and terminates after only a few centimeters, A PICC line is usually inserted in the arm using ultrasound to guide the specially trained nurse or technician who is doing the insertion.  PICC lines differ from peripheral IV access but are similar to central lines in that a PICCs termination point is centrally located in the body allowing for treatment that could not be obtained from standard periphery IV access, such as chemotherapy, prolonged antibiotic treatment or TPN nutrition.   Read more…